professional storytelling

Entrepreneur Notes: Simplifying the Menu

Entrepreneur Notes: Simplifying the Menu

Last month I was starting to feel overwhelmed by the number of small group workshops that I offered through Tell Me A Story. The way my business is set up, I only ever run one workshop at a time, but in theory I could rotate between three Deep Dive workshops (it takes place over a month to 6 weeks and meets 4 times total) and two Master Classes (two hour one-off sessions) and then I have these two hybrid offerings PLUS my 1-on-1 sessions with clients. Is your head spinning reading this? Mine certainly was.

Communicating with ease doesn't come easy

Communicating with ease doesn't come easy

I left college in NYC with a degree in Vocal Performance and crippling stage fright. For the first few years out of school I could hide from the fear because I wasn’t putting myself out there to be seen, judged, evaluated, or even praised. After one Summer of auditions, I took an office job and spent most of my free time at brunch, watching reality TV, and going to DJ nights.

6 Ways Personal Narrative Will Help You Professionally

6 Ways Personal Narrative Will Help You Professionally

Last week I moderated a panel discussion on developing your personal brand. There was a lot of debate amongst the panelists and audience members regarding how much we share from our personal lives when in a professional setting. Should you have two Instagram account? (My intern recently told me about FINSTA vs. RINSTA, and my mind was blown.) Do we stay buttoned up - both on the inside and outside - and keep our hobbies, passions, and feelings at bay?

Here’s my philosophy. Meld the professional with the personal. Be yourself and use storytelling as your guide. Here are six ways that crafting your personal narrative will help you professionally. 

Toastmasters is a thing of the past.

Toastmasters is a thing of the past.

Storytelling is the future.

In Brené Brown’s book, Daring Greatly, she says this:

For three days I sat and watched some of the most amazing and provocative talks that I've ever seen. After each talk, I slumped a little lower in my chair with the realization that in order for my talk "to work" I'd have to give up trying to do it like everyone else and I'd have to connect with the audience. I desperately wanted to see a talk that I could copy or use as a template, but the talks that resonated the most strongly with me didn't follow a format, they were just genuine. This meant I'd have to be me.

Though she is speaking about TEDTalks and that style of public speaking that people often feel the need to replicate or imitate, we wholeheartedly agree with her sentiment. And we think that Toastmasters leads to a need to make it “work”. Templates don’t work. Authenticity does.